Skip to main content

About your Search

COM 21
( more )
English 120
Search Results 100 to 117 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)
editor. chris s the president, you know, he's had interviews with npr, today he was in maryland at this university. is the president signaling that he may be getting close to agreeing to a deal that would raise this debt ceiling and that would have no tax hikes in it? >> reporter: well, he'll have to give his base something. he can't expect them to walk into this without even a symbolic tax increase. but, yes, obviously, what's happening now is the president is trying to soften the blow for his supporters being in a deep blue, very liberal state like maryland, being on a college campus be, rallying supporters in if a campaign-style event and, as you said, going on national public radio. these are all efforts on the president's part to reach out to liberals and say, look, i don't want to do a deal like this, but i have no choice so please understand me as i have to do this. martha: all right. we've got another piece of sound we want to play for everybody in relation to this. >> in order for us to solve the debt deficit problems, we've got to cut spending that we don't need, we ha
it is people npr? why not just concentrate on the basic? >> i don't believe so. like it or not they me have a strong interest in policing. they put significant demands on the metropolitan police and officers are doing their investigation, wanting information. the police officers would be spending their time trying to deal with that approach. and i feel a having press officers in place, that we are able to take the pressure off the investigative officers to get on with their jobs, and if the main press officers -- [inaudible] >> could some savings be made in your department? >> there's always savings to be made. my department has contributed in the last 10 years. >> could we make a quick, please? >> mr. fedorcio, you were the main contact at the met with some of these journalist. your name all over meetings. it's important to be transparent about these things and the met has a publication about what we've are discussed. when i look on line however, it appeared as no gift hostile these passionate hospitality since 2009. 12 lunches, two dinners. was what's going on, were you trying to not tell
times, watch c-span, listen to npr. however, also read your history. >> well, i also read "the wall street journal" as well as "the new york times" to get a balanced view. [laughter] >> and our friends at the journal will like that. >> yeah. >> um, if founders were somehow magically transported here today, what would they recognize, and what would shock them? >> well, the question you ask is interesting in itself. i give a talk to people like this audience here, and inevitably someone will say, well, what would thomas jefferson think of affirmative action, or what would george washington think of the invasion of iraq? i mean, those are really fascinating questions that people, ordinary people will ask. and, you know, you can't imagine other countries doing that. i mean, i don't think anyone in england would say, well, what would one of the two william pitts' think of david cameron's goth? they just wouldn't ask that. so we have an intimate connection. and historians have mocked that. and i don't mock it. lincoln had that connection, however, and it's not so easy to mock lincoln. he
are wondering where the government can cut costs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to have more doors than "get smart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. hot off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they cost nearly 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the f
. let's try out this one, a quote from president obama on npr. he said, ronald reagan repeatedly talked about how irresponsible it would be to allow the full faith and credit of the united states to be impaired in any way. what's verdict on that one? >> we rated this one mostly true. we dug into the historical documents and we found reagan did say the u.s. should pay its debts and it should not be in document now, presidents usually support increases to the debt ceiling while congress comp plain it we know that, rated mostly true. >> finally, it one from victoria jackson, she's comedian and tea party supporter. a clause niptd obama care bill, which is now law, gives obama the right to form a private army. what do we make of that? >> this one got the pants on fire. it seemed to be a serious commentary so we took it seriously and checked it. the health care law does expand the public health service, which has a uniformed commission corps, but doctors and nurses, not members of the military no private armies in the health care bill. >> she is a comedian, maybe she was joke, we will give he
, credit rating staff and others to discuss alternatives to credit ratings to commenters on npr and participants expressed concern on the removal of credit ratings from our regulations and assert their credit ratings can be a valuable tool for assessing creditworthiness. many commenters believe that the simple approaches outlined in the option due to their lack of risk sensitivity create incentives for inappropriate risk arbitrage. however, commenters are also concerned that the more complex and risk sensitive approaches due to the depth and type of analysis that will be required posted disproportionate burden on small banks. commenters also expressed concern certain alternatives could create competitive inequities and inconsistencies with international capital standards established by the basel committee. these comments reflect the challenges that the occ and other federal banking agencies are facing as we work to implement 939a. we believe that with appropriate operational and due diligence requirements, credit ratings can be one vital factor to consider when evaluating the cr
administrator for communications at nasa. mark, additional news at npr. captain mark kelly, astronauts, two-time shuttle pilot, commander, most recently commander of sts 134. spouse of a member of congress that has traveled to space. skip over the podium. melissa with news took media. she is the very effective speakers' committee chair who helped to get things going here for armor speakers' committee. lee perry man is the director of emps with associated press. he has organized two luncheons in a very short amount of time, and we are grateful for that. lowry is the nasa deputy administrator. elaine is the director in chief -- the editor in chief of "aerospace america." chris chambers, a professor at georgetown university and commentator for "russia today." mark, executive director with goi foundation. former national security assignment editor, reuter correspondent and pentagon producer at abc news. [applause] today's luncheon is not just about charles bolden, but about the future of nasa, which he leads. it is about his vision, president obama's vision, and some daunting and harsh budget r
because it singled out npr. >> when we write a law and defund one organization doing something, we defund all organizations doing the same thing. >> read all about the yes, no, present vote on the facebook page. which some suspect he might rely on too much. >> many districting, his is up with of them where you have older voters that don't look at facebook all the time. >> going forward, more and more people will find it easy to do this and put explanation on facebook. i think i'm a trend-setter in the sense. >> so far, it's a trend of one. with the safe g.o.p. district at home and what they like is the performance in congress. he is free to continue facebooking away on the house floor. steve brown, fox news. >> shannon: many of you are hitting the roads this holiday weekend but have the high gas prices changed your travel plans? we take a closer look after this break. the more we loved it. took some wild risks when i was young. but i was still taking a risk with my cholesterol. anyone with high cholesterol may be at increased risk of heart attack. diet and exercise weren't enough for me.
experience at npr which happens last year when you were fired. you have done a quick turn around on a book, fantastic book called "muzzled". a great title because you felt like you were muzzled in the situation there. right? >> yeah, you know, something -- again, we're talking about the budget debate this morning and i think you guys are right on target. when you say look, people are talking about -- i've got this plan, i've got that plan. here's my message to the voters. here's this message. say, you know, we don't need competing plans. we need a deal. we need people who are going to talk to each other and offer not only the ability to speak and shout and use bumper sticker slogans but actually listen to each other and then compromise and reach a deal in service to the american people. and what i've had in my experience after i got fired was so many people came up to me and said, you mean because you get nervous at airports when you see people in muslim garb after 9/11, you got fired? you know, i have a similar feeling and the people start to say i can't talk about certain things or some
. on the other hand, we don't want gaps in consumer protection. both cnn and npr have reported that banks which are not within fcc's jurisdiction are selling information that they collect from credit and debit purchases. that is, they are selling their consumers entire purchase histories to retailers. also privacy legislation -- if such legislation is limited to a select group of data collected. for example, if privacy legislation is limited to companies within the ftc's jurisdiction, as are many of the current proposals, the house and the senate, retailers such as amazon would be limited in collecting and selling data about a consumers shopping habit. citibank would be totally free to collect and sell that same information to amazon. do any of you have any concerns about such a scenario? >> i can address the question, and i will do it in reference to the draft bill that was discussed earlier, the data act, where the agency does have a concern if drafted. breach notification, there's a carpet for entities that we subject to the ftc's jurisdiction so we do have a concern about that gap. >> some
wants to challenge me, give me a break, it's legal now. the npr reporter explained that the teacher now discusses gay sex with students tore rowly and explicitly with a chart in the 8th grade. i feel like i'm representing parents who have not been invited to speak who have a seriously held religious view that marriage is between one man and woman and they want to protect their young children against other views. robin in 2006 had their 7-year-old son joey come home to tell about a book the teacher read to the 1st grade class on same-sex relationships. they thought he was mistaken at first. the request the school inform them about such presentations, and they were turned down. another couple, david and tonya parker had a worse result when questioning the teaching of the same-sex issues to their young son. mr. parker found himself in jail. i'm trying to be a good dad parker said after the arrangement. they were christians attempting to follow their faith. we're not intoller rapt said his wife. we love all people. that's part of our faith, but see the judge ruled in that case, the case of
is the administrator for communications at nasa. mark is the managing editor for digital news at npr. captain mark kelly is an astronaut, shuttle pilot, shuttle commander, and commander of the final mission for endeavour. the only spouse of a member of congress who less traveled into space. he is not just any -- it is kebra a difference. -- gabrielle giffords. [applause] we will skip over the podium for a moment. she is the committee chair who helps to get things going for our committee. we will skip over the speaker. he is the director of the associated press broadcast. he has organized lunches in a short amount of time and we're grateful for his work. lori is the deputy minister later. alain is director in chief of aerospace america. . he is a commentator for russia today. our partners in space. mark is the executive director and a former vice president of communication. he is also a former security assignment editor at abc news. today's newsmaker luncheon is not just about administrator charlie bolton but also about the future of nasa. it is about his vision and some daunting and budgetary real
the debt and, many tea partiers and many americans think we can cut out spending on npr and arts funding and foreign aid and that will take care of the debt problem and that is less than 1% of the budget, you have to cut the programs americans don't touched and the democrats keep swearing, oh, we'll never touch medicare and social security, well then we'll have debts and, deficits as far that's eye can see. >> michelle bachmann said she doesn't think we have to raise the debt ceiling. what are your thoughts. >> i'm very interested in the, because it doesn't make any sense. we have enough revenue coming in from the taxes, month-to-month, week-to-week, to service the national debt and pay social security, and medicare and medicaid. so i don't understand why our rating would go down unless the ratings agencies are trying to suck up to the democrats, on the other hand, i have seen some economists say, yes, it will lower our debt rating and will make -- it doesn't make any sense, because it is the equivalent of, you payer mortgage month-to-month and make those piloavements and you stop buying
Search Results 100 to 117 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)